THE SAGA OF DUBLIN’S 70-YEAR-OLD BUSÁRAS

Title: Irish Bus & Coach Annual 2024

Author: Ed O’Neill

Publisher: Irish Retro Transport

Specification: 295mm x 210mm, 80pp, softback

ISBN: None

Price: £13 or €15

This omnibus on omnibuses comes from the author and publisher of the recent series of books profiling major classes of double-deckers, Leyland Titans and Atlanteans mainly, in the fleets of Coras Impair Éireann (CIÉ) and its successors in Ireland.

Thirteen articles, some pictorial, others with more words, span both sides of the Irish border and cover a wide sphere of interests and periods of time from the 19th century to the present day.

It opens with a particularly informative piece by Paul Clerkin, an architect and historian, on the 70th anniversary, reached last October, of the opening of the Busáras, the distinctive if compact central bus station at Store Street in Dublin.

Like many of the best such tales, this is not just a description of the building but of the political twists and turns that dogged the project, causing it to take seven years from the start of construction to it opening for business. This was a facility that many believed that Dublin needed, as the routes radiating out to the rest of the 26 counties picked up and set down their passengers at kerbsides by the banks of the River Liffey, which in what might politely be described as a temperate maritime climate meant passengers often stood in the rain.

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