THE SIXTIES CHILD THAT DEFINED THE SEVENTIES

In the first of three articles celebrating 50 years of the Leyland National, ALAN MILLAR says that parallel developments in the operating and manufacturing industries persuaded Leyland to invest in a brand new factory and car manufacturing techniques to build a mass-produced single-decker for Britain and abroad

Preserved Leyland Nationals posed at the site of the Lillyhall factory, now an Eddie Stobart logistics depot, during the Workington Transport Trust’s two-day event at the early spring bank holiday to mark the 50 th anniversary of the type’s entry into service.
ANDY RIGBY

The Leyland National — the vehicle that defined the 1970s — holds a unique place in British bus history.

A joint venture by Leyland and the stateowned National Bus Company, it was a technically advanced, highly standardised single-decker that was mass-produced using car manufacturing techniques in a new factory dedicated to its construction.

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